Today, in varying forms and degrees, many countries are witnessing crime and deviance, suicide, poverty, divorce, homelessness, unemployment, corruption, violence, terrorism, pollution, (undocumented) migration, and identity-based discrimination such as gender, social class, sexuality, and race and ethnicity. Are you interested in joining on-going conversations focused on understanding and responding to these issues? This course allows students to enter a like-minded community of thinkers – classical and modern – bonded by their commitment to addressing social issues in a unique discipline called Sociology. In this course, students will develop a practical understanding of social action, social order, social change, and social problems and policy responses. We will also discuss how socialization shapes our attitudes and social actions and inactions, and how our identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and nationality) affect our life chances by granting us privileges or disadvantages. The course will help students understand the connections between private and public troubles. Students will thus grasp central theoretical and methodological debates in Sociology and the relationship between the individual and society. 

The course provides an introduction to the history of social welfare and the development of Canadian social policy and the social service system.  Major developments in social policy will be explored in the context of shifts in dominant world views. A close exploration of the relationship between social work and social policy within the Canadian context will be undertaken.  A framework for completing a policy analysis will be introduced.

This is a survey course for all students interested in social work, curious about the relevance of arts and social science disciplines to social work fields of practice, and/or who wish to explore the profession as a potential career choice. Students will be introduced to the values, ethics, history and requirements of professional social work practice, with particular emphasis on social justice issues. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the various social work fields of practice. 3 credit hours.

As social work students begin their second theory course of the post-degree Bachelor of Social Work program, they have developed at least a beginning understanding of the assumptions and theoretical foundations for structural social work practice, and have had the opportunity to distinguish the ideological and practice differences between ‘conventional’ and structural social work.  As well, most students are beginning to develop a repertoire of generalist practice skills.  In this course, students have the opportunity to build on this foundation and develop strong links between theory and practice, so that they are prepared to actively engage in the practice of social work in their field placements and as they enter their professional social work careers.

Professional practice requires that each social worker has developed, and is able to articulate, their own approach to social work and those professional values are integrated with their personal belief system.  When social workers have a clear sense of their own assumptions and beliefs, they are in a much more effective position to be able to evaluate critically their own practice and, as a result, are more able to develop and enhance their knowledge and skills as they gain professional experience.

The overall purpose of SCWK 5046 is to assist students to strengthen both their theoretical foundation for social work practice and their ability to integrate into their personal and professional lives developing knowledge, skills, and values.  This course will present some recent and critical developments in knowledge and theory along with a variety of theories that may enhance structural social work practice if integrated appropriately.  A variety of theories that inform direct practice approaches will be studied.

Class time will be spent introducing and critically exploring these theories and developments, and their application to social work practice.  Through this process students will be encouraged to clarify and articulate their own assumptions and beliefs, their approach to social work, and their ability to operationalize their approach in work at the individual, group, and community levels.  

As social work students begin their second theory course of the post-degree Bachelor of Social Work program, they have developed at least a beginning understanding of the assumptions and theoretical foundations for structural social work practice, and have had the opportunity to distinguish the ideological and practice differences between ‘conventional’ and structural social work.  As well, most students are beginning to develop a repertoire of generalist practice skills.  In this course, students have the opportunity to build on this foundation and develop strong links between theory and practice, so that they are prepared to actively engage in the practice of social work in their field placements and as they enter their professional social work careers.

Professional practice requires that each social worker has developed, and is able to articulate, their own approach to social work and those professional values are integrated with their personal belief system.  When social workers have a clear sense of their own assumptions and beliefs, they are in a much more effective position to be able to evaluate critically their own practice and, as a result, are more able to develop and enhance their knowledge and skills as they gain professional experience.

The overall purpose of SCWK 5046 is to assist students to strengthen both their theoretical foundation for social work practice and their ability to integrate into their personal and professional lives developing knowledge, skills, and values.  This course will present some recent and critical developments in knowledge and theory along with a variety of theories that may enhance structural social work practice if integrated appropriately.  A variety of theories that inform direct practice approaches will be studied.

The purpose of this course is to help students develop personal and professional skills for critical professional social work practice. This includes increasing self-awareness as important knowledge for practice; an emphasis on developing skills for experiential learning; an orientation to the values and characteristics of the social work profession, professionalism and social work practice; and the development of beginning competency in generic crisis intervention theory as well as skills common to all levels of social work practice. The course will also prepare students for their initial field education experience through the clarification of expectations of students in a field placement, including emphasis on preparation of learning contracts. This course intends that students will be able to generalize both personal and professional knowledge and skills to the broad range of clients, groups and communities with which they may intervene.

This course is designed to introduce students to child welfare systems in New Brunswick and Canada, and to examine the policies, procedures, and practices which have been developed to respond to the needs of children and adolescents.