Earth is becoming increasingly destabilized as a planetary system that  has supported human civilization for the past 10,000 years. This is the  result of complex interactions between human societies and the natural  world within which they are embedded. To understand the current  ecological/climate crises, we need to understand these interactions.   This course is an introduction to the societal processes that are  interfering with the Earth's regulatory systems that allow all life to  thrive, and the implications of that human interference. Our starting  point is our own personal involvement in those social processes through  our ecological footprint analysis; from there we link our personal  actions to broader cultural-economic systems that are now global in  scope.

Earth is becoming increasingly destabilized as a planetary system that  has supported human civilization for the past 10,000 years. This is the  result of complex interactions between human societies and the natural  world within which they are embedded. To understand the current  ecological/climate crises, we need to understand these interactions.   This course is an introduction to the societal processes that are  interfering with the Earth's regulatory systems that allow all life to  thrive, and the implications of that human interference. Our starting  point is our own personal involvement in those social processes through  our ecological footprint analysis; from there we link our personal  actions to broader cultural-economic systems that are now global in  scope.

Earth is becoming increasingly destabilized as a planetary system that  has supported human civilization for the past 10,000 years. This is the  result of complex interactions between human societies and the natural  world within which they are embedded. To understand the current  ecological/climate crises, we need to understand these interactions.   This course is an introduction to the societal processes that are  interfering with the Earth's regulatory systems that allow all life to  thrive, and the implications of that human interference. Our starting  point is our own personal involvement in those social processes through  our ecological footprint analysis; from there we link our personal  actions to broader cultural-economic systems that are now global in  scope.

Effective citizenship springs from engagement with issues that matter to the citizen. In environmental realm, it requires personal knowledge of the bioregion within which one lives including its biodiversity and the functioning of its ecosystems. This partly field-based course introduces students to environmental controversies and discourses active in New Brunswick and the Maritimes as seen from southern New Brunswick; the flow of materials, energy and waste from the ecosystem through human systems and back again; and the implications of these flows for sustainability. Students will also open a window to the natural world by hands-on study of the forests and wildlife of the Fredericton area. This engagement will be used as a springboard to the literary tradition of nature writing in which writers infuse their intense observations of natural history with ethical reflections on being an inhabitant, rather than simply a resident, of a place. 

Praxis can be understood as reflection and action for social change. Drawing on learning in ENVS 1013, students will investigate how global environmental problems are manifested at the local level. They will then develop local action strategies to effect change in those systems. This approach will foster citizenship skills and empower students in the face of global problems. This course will qualify for the STU Experiential Learning Certificate. Prerequisite: ENVS 1013.

This Moodle site contains several environmental issue case studies compiled by Prof. Harvey for use in her course, Introduction to Environmental Perspectives.  Students in ENVS 2023 should enroll in this "course" as well as ENVS 2023.